Type: Blog
Date Posted: Oct 04, 2014
This year's Wilderness Risk Management Conference in Atlanta was a superb three-day event focusing on critical issues relating to risk management for outdoor programs.
Type: Media
Date Posted: Aug 06, 2014
The Risk Assessment and Safety Management Model (RASM) by Rick Curtis has been presented at national and international conferences including the Wilderness Risk Management Conference and the Association for Experiential Education Conference.
Type: Article
Date Posted: Jun 22, 2014
To my knowledge no single government body collects figures on all causes of sudden or accidental death. As a result we never get to see a clear representation of the Health and Safety of the Nation, let alone the Health and Safety of Young People.
Type: Article
Date Posted: Nov 30, 2013
Free Sample Case from the Recreation Law Center. Find more cases to help you manage legal liability for your program.
Type: Article
Date Posted: Nov 30, 2013
Are you Managing All your Legal Risks? Find out how from the Recreation Law Center Experts!
Type: Article
Date Posted: Nov 29, 2013
These are some useful resources on Risk Management.
Type: Article
Date Posted: May 12, 2013
I. Introduction Those who are trained in wilderness medicine should be aware of exposure to liability when they use the skills they have learned. This can be a bit more complicated than you might think.
Type: Article
Date Posted: May 12, 2013
Outdoor programs tend to take safety issues seriously and perhaps for this reason usually have low loss experiences. Yet sound risk management requires more than an attitude. It comes from an understanding of the concepts and acting on that understanding.
Type: Article
Date Posted: May 12, 2013
The primary purpose of a risk management plan is not the avoidance of legal liability. Rather, it is the maintenance of a quality program; that is, one which deals reasonably and fairly with its clients or students and their families.
Type: Article
Date Posted: May 12, 2013
A student fractures a leg, dislocates a shoulder or lapses into a coma. Weather and terrain prevent radio communication. You are five hours from the trailhead and a telephone. Medical analysis and care are needed. Now, what do you do? How will your conduct be judged?