Type: Event
Date Posted: Nov 02, 2018
  Mark your calendar for the 26th annual conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 30-November 1, 2019.
Type: Document
Date Posted: Oct 31, 2017
Poster and resource handout from Poster Session at the 2017 Wilderness Risk Management Conference. Download PDF files for full posters.
Type: Media
Date Posted: Oct 22, 2017
at the 2016 Wilderness Risk Management Conference Bruce Palmer presents on how to deal with communication during a crisis in the age of fast paced social media. Bruce is the admission and marketing director for the National Outdoor Leadership School in Lander, Wyoming.
Type: Media
Date Posted: Feb 19, 2017
Attend the Wilderness Risk Management Conference (WRMC) and gain practical risk management skills, network with others in the industry, share field and administrative techniques, and help develop risk management standards for the adventure and education industries.
Type: Blog
Date Posted: Oct 17, 2016
The 2016 Wilderness Risk Management Conference was held October 12-14 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Over 420 participants from the US, Canada, and across the globe came for this annual gathering of outdoor professionals focusing on risk management.
Type: Article
Date Posted: Oct 13, 2016
This is the PowerPoint from a presentation from the 2016 Wilderness Risk Management Conference. 
Type: Media
Date Posted: Jul 04, 2016
Outward Bound incident data indicates that random chance has a greater effect on overall incident rates than factors such as training or the technicality of the program activities.
Type: Media
Date Posted: Jul 04, 2016
The keynote presentation from the 2014 Wilderness Risk Management Conference by Captain Andy Chase.
Type: Media
Date Posted: Mar 20, 2016
This keynote is just one of the reasons that outdoor professionals from around the world come to the annual Wilderness Risk Management Conference. Learn More
Type: Media
Date Posted: Nov 24, 2015
Emergent findings in social psychology point to the limitations of cognition and rationality; decision-making, it turns out, is highly over-rated.